Historical Whatsits

historical-nonfiction:

In 1941, together with co-inventor George Antheil, she submitted her secret radio-guided torpedo system which allowed a torpedo to switch (or hop) between 88 different frequencies, making it virtually impossible for the enemy to track and detect the incoming torpedo.

The system was so…

szyymcio:

Polish-born people in England and Wales as of 2011
In 2011, there was 579,121 people in England and Wales whose country of birth was Poland. Poles made up 1% of total population. London alone hosted 158,300 Poles (about one-third of them lived in Inner London and two-thirds lived in outer London). The London borough of Ealing appears to be the most Polish place in the country, with 6.4% of total population claiming being born in Poland.

szyymcio:

Polish-born people in England and Wales as of 2011

In 2011, there was 579,121 people in England and Wales whose country of birth was Poland. Poles made up 1% of total population. London alone hosted 158,300 Poles (about one-third of them lived in Inner London and two-thirds lived in outer London). The London borough of Ealing appears to be the most Polish place in the country, with 6.4% of total population claiming being born in Poland.

unhistorical:

…the Saints are displayed in a cathedral in Eastern Germany close to the Czech border and were acquired in the 17th century when there was a big trade in relics. They are said to be the remains of Martyred saints that were stored in the catacombs of Rome before being removed and traded. They were reassembled and dressed in their fine regalia and displayed in ornate cabinets.

Toby de Silva

archaicwonder:

Northern European Silver Torque, late 4th century BC
Silver torque is fashioned as two thick strands of twisted wire that meet in the front in a Herakles knot. The thicker twists are augmented by a thinner strand of metal. The twists fade out towards the clasp of the torque, which is fashioned as two knobbed, U-shaped hooks that interlock at the back.

archaicwonder:

Northern European Silver Torque, late 4th century BC

Silver torque is fashioned as two thick strands of twisted wire that meet in the front in a Herakles knot. The thicker twists are augmented by a thinner strand of metal. The twists fade out towards the clasp of the torque, which is fashioned as two knobbed, U-shaped hooks that interlock at the back.

nerdofwar:

The Renaissance book Erotokritos is a unique preserved manuscript with colour illustrations belonging to the library of the Romanian Academy. The book is translated from Greek to Romanian. The photos below and the text are taken from the ΑΔΑΜ…

fashionsfromhistory:

Day Dress

c.1885

United States

This dress belonged to Amelia Beard Hollenback (1844-1918), wife of the prominent financier and philanthropist John Welles Hollenback (1835-1927). In 1874, the Hollenback family settled in the neighborhood of Clinton Hill in Brooklyn. In the 19th century, Brooklyn became a metropolitan center with numerous affluent neighborhoods and a thriving downtown shopping district. Like many of the garments in Hollenback gift, this dress was most likely custom-made by a Brooklyn-based dressmaker. The unusual color and intriguing use of solid and striped wool fabric in this day dress has a folkloric aesthetic, which may have been inspired by an Amelia Hollenback’s travels through the Southwest. The inventive asymmetrical draping shows a high level of sophistication and design sensibility that was atypical for a day dress. (X)

MET

castlesandmanorhouses:

Palace of the Grand Master of the Knights of Rhodes (ie the Knights Hospitaller) on the island of Rhodes in Greece.
http://www.castlesandmanorhouses.com/photos.htm
The Palace is one of the few examples of Gothic architecture in Greece. It was previously a citadel of the Knights Hospitaller and functioned as a palace, headquarters and fortress.
The present palace was built in the early 14th century by the Knights of Rhodes, who controlled Rhodes and other Greek islands from 1309 to 1522, to house the Grand Master of the Order.
After the island was captured by the Ottoman Sultan, the palace continued to be used as a command centre and fortress.

castlesandmanorhouses:

Palace of the Grand Master of the Knights of Rhodes (ie the Knights Hospitaller) on the island of Rhodes in Greece.

http://www.castlesandmanorhouses.com/photos.htm

The Palace is one of the few examples of Gothic architecture in Greece. It was previously a citadel of the Knights Hospitaller and functioned as a palace, headquarters and fortress.

The present palace was built in the early 14th century by the Knights of Rhodes, who controlled Rhodes and other Greek islands from 1309 to 1522, to house the Grand Master of the Order.

After the island was captured by the Ottoman Sultan, the palace continued to be used as a command centre and fortress.

wapiti3:

Alpine Flora: Western Alps / by G. Senn; with 144 colored plates after watercolors painted on locations of C. Kaftner. on Flickr.

Publication info Heidelberg: C. Winter, 1906.
BHL Collections:
New York Botanical Garden

fashionsfromhistory:

Woman’s Semi Formal Domestic Overcoat
Early 1900s
Qing Dynasty

In early 1900, it became fashionable for young brides to wear pastel shades on their wedding day, instead of the customary red-color garments. A narrower silhouette for jackets and the sleeves became fashionable, and front closures replaced right-side closure of the earlier period.

IMA

fashionsfromhistory:

Woman’s Semi Formal Domestic Overcoat

Early 1900s

Qing Dynasty

In early 1900, it became fashionable for young brides to wear pastel shades on their wedding day, instead of the customary red-color garments. A narrower silhouette for jackets and the sleeves became fashionable, and front closures replaced right-side closure of the earlier period.

IMA

questionableadvice:

~ Scott Tissue, 1938via Flickr"You may love to go to a friend’s home for a dozen reasons, and yet if she overlooks this most important nicety, you’re bound to be a little shocked…"

questionableadvice:

~ Scott Tissue, 1938
via Flickr

"You may love to go to a friend’s home for a dozen reasons, and yet if she overlooks this most important nicety, you’re bound to be a little shocked…"